Rugby World Cup Final 2019 Live

Rugby World Cup Final 2019 Live : Rugby World Cup Final 2019 Live Stream Watch The 2019 Rugby World Cup runs from Friday 20 September to Saturday 2 November Sat 2 Nov RWC 2019 Final England vs South Africa (Yokohama), 9.00am. So it all comes down to this. Four years, 40-odd Tests, countless training sessions and now there’s just one match left to decide the 2019 world champions.

Just 80 minutes (okay, a few more if it goes into extra-time) will decide if it’s England or South Africa who lift the Webb Ellis Cup in Yokohama on Saturday night.

Related: What happens if there’s a draw at the World Cup

It’s a goal Eddie Jones has been working towards ever since he took the reins post-RWC 2015. “We’ve had four years to prepare for this game,” he says. “We know we’ve done the work. We’ve spent four years getting ready for this occasion.

“They’ve got a history of being the most physically intimidating team in the world, so we’ve got to take that away from them. We’ve got to meet their physicality but we are looking forward to that and being able to impose our game on them. We’ve got to take the game to South Africa, we can’t expect them to give us the game. The whole mindset we’re taking into the game is to play with no fear.”

That can be easier said than done given the size of the occasion, a World Cup final, but they will take confidence not only from their performance against New Zealand in the semi-finals but their form throughout the tournament.

2019 Rugby World Cup Final: England v South Africa
New arrival: Eddie Jones talks to replacement scrum-half Ben Spencer (Getty Images)

Jones has stuck with the same starting XV that beat the All Blacks, with the only change coming on the bench – Ben Spencer replacing the injured Willi Heinz.

South Africa have made only one change, too, with Cheslin Kolbe fit to return to the wing in place of S’busiso Nkosi. Rassie Erasmus has stuck with his six-two split on the bench, no doubt hoping to overpower England with fresh forwards in the second half.

The challenge for England will be whether they are able to play the more expansive game they have shown in previous matches in the face of the Boks’ physicality and relentless box-kicking. South Africa won their last two finals without scoring a try, and this could be a similar tight, edgy affair.

There’s not long now until we find out if it will be England for a second time or South Africa for a third with their name engraved on the trophy. Here are all the match details you need…

Head-to-Head

Played – 42

England wins – 15

South Africa wins – 25

Draws – 2

Most recent meeting – England 12-11 South Africa, November 2018

South Africa dominated the first half of this match at Twickenham last year, their physicality coming to the fore, but were only 8-6 up at half-time. It then came down to an exchange of penalties in the second half, with Owen Farrell’s 72nd-minute one proving decisive.

It did look like the Springboks would have another chance to regain the lead when Farrell led with the shoulder into a tackle on André Esterhuizen. It was reviewed by referee Angus Gardner but no penalty was awarded.

Related: World Cup final referee Jerome Garces

Did you know?

England’s starting XV has an average age of 27 years and 60 days, making it the youngest team to start a Rugby World Cup final in the professional era.
Ben Youngs and George Ford play together at nine and ten for the 34th time for England. No half-back partnership has played as much for England in the professional era.
Tom Curry and Sam Underhill will be the youngest flankers to ever start together in a Rugby World Cup final, averaging 22 years and 121 days.
Eddie Jones is the first foreign coach to lead any nation to a RWC final.
Siya Kolisi will play in his 50th Test for South Africa

Rugby World Cup Final 2019

Rugby World Cup Final 2019: Watch RWC Final 2019 Following five weeks of RWC action, organisers unveil the unique design of gold, silver and bronze medals that will become treasured mementos of an unforgettable tournament. hope inside knowledge can halt England in Rugby World Cup final to aid their preparation for Saturday’s World Cup final against England
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TOKYO, 29 Oct – Following an incredible five weeks of Rugby World Cup action, and with the rugby world counting down to the final weekend of Rugby World Cup 2019, World Rugby and the Japan 2019 Organising Committee have revealed the designs for the gold, silver and bronze medals for this weekend’s bronze final and final.

Designed by famed Japanese master craftsman and national living treasure, Minori Yoshita, the medals encapsulate Japan’s seamless blend of profound respect for tradition, coupled with its deep spirit of cutting-edge, technical innovation.

Rugby World Cup 2019 Organising Committee CEO Akira Shimazu said: “These stunning medals capture the most iconic symbols of Japan – our beloved cherry blossoms, the ubiquitous torii gate and the rising sun atop Mount Fuji – and combine them with the Webb Ellis Cup and the Rugby World Cup 2019 logo. They signify the bonds of friendship and respect that bind the world of rugby.”

World Rugby Chairman Sir Bill Beaumont said: “Playing in a Rugby World Cup final is the absolute pinnacle for any elite rugby player. These remarkably beautiful medals are sure to be cherished for years to come. Long into the future, they will help transport these players back to Japan and back to their treasured memories of this weekend when they, their teams and fans from across Japan and throughout the world write another memorable chapter in the glorious history of Rugby World Cup.”

Finals Medals

The face of the medals features a silhouette of the Webb Ellis Cup placed upon the Rugby World Cup 2019 ‘unity graphic’ comprising patterns drawn from ancient Japanese Byōbu decorative screens brought together in a circle encapsulating a stylised image of Japan’s sacred Mount Fuji. The image symbolises a theme so often encountered in all aspects of life in Japan, the seamless connection of the ancient with the modern.

The purple medal ribbon which symbolises respect passes through a symbolic torii gate. Seen throughout Japan at the entrance to Shinto shrines, the torii gate symbolises the transition from the mundane to the sacred, a fitting metaphor for the achievements this medal recognises.

The rear of the medal is adorned by Japan’s beloved sakura, the ubiquitous cherry blossom held so dear by all Japan and which features so deeply in the Japanese psyche. The sakura motif frames the unmissable Rugby World Cup 2019 logo that symbolises the coming together of Japan as it welcomes the global rugby community, with the Rising Sun and Mount Fuji seamlessly blended into World Rugby’s iconic logo.

The medal ribbon is made from rare Kumihimo Japanese silk, a material treasured for centuries for both its famed softness and incredible durability. Kumihimo silk was a prized material in the wardrobes of high nobles and in the armour of Japan’s highest ranked samurai. This silk is specially sourced from small, boutique silk growers in Kumamoto, Saitama and Iwate, all prefectures that played proud host to Rugby World Cup 2019 matches. With less than 0.38 per cent of silk used in Japan domestically grown, of which the highest grade Kumihimo silk makes up a small component, this silk is truly rare and highly valued among Japanese.

Minori Yoshita

Born in 1932, Minori Yoshita is the master of the world famous Kinzan Gama. An expert proponent of the Yūri-kinsai technique, Yoshita was recognised as a National Living Treasure of Japan in 2001. Developed in the historical city of Kanazawa in the 1960s, Yūri-kinsai is a highly specialised gold leaf-application technique used in Japanese pottery and porcelain. This technique is the inspiration of the sakura motifs on all Rugby World Cup 2019 medals, which were created under the direction of Minori Yoshita.

Rugby World Cup Final 2019

Rugby World Cup Final 2019 : Rugby World Cup Final 2019 Live Stream Free Online Watch 2019 Rugby World Cup Final will be a rugby union match to determine the winner of the 2019 Rugby World Cup. It will be played between England and South Africa, a rematch of the 2007 Rugby World Cup Final. The match will be played on 2 November 2019 at the International Stadium Yokohama in Yokohama, Japan

Rugby World Cup Final 2019 Live : Rugby World Cup Final 2019 Live Stream Watch The 2019 Rugby World Cup runs from Friday 20 September to Saturday 2 November Sat 2 Nov RWC 2019 Final England vs South Africa (Yokohama), 9.00am. So it all comes down to this. Four years, 40-odd Tests, countless training sessions and now there’s just one match left to decide the 2019 world champions.

Just 80 minutes (okay, a few more if it goes into extra-time) will decide if it’s England or South Africa who lift the Webb Ellis Cup in Yokohama on Saturday night.

Related: What happens if there’s a draw at the World Cup

It’s a goal Eddie Jones has been working towards ever since he took the reins post-RWC 2015. “We’ve had four years to prepare for this game,” he says. “We know we’ve done the work. We’ve spent four years getting ready for this occasion.

“They’ve got a history of being the most physically intimidating team in the world, so we’ve got to take that away from them. We’ve got to meet their physicality but we are looking forward to that and being able to impose our game on them. We’ve got to take the game to South Africa, we can’t expect them to give us the game. The whole mindset we’re taking into the game is to play with no fear.”

That can be easier said than done given the size of the occasion, a World Cup final, but they will take confidence not only from their performance against New Zealand in the semi-finals but their form throughout the tournament.

2019 Rugby World Cup Final: England v South Africa
New arrival: Eddie Jones talks to replacement scrum-half Ben Spencer (Getty Images)

Jones has stuck with the same starting XV that beat the All Blacks, with the only change coming on the bench – Ben Spencer replacing the injured Willi Heinz.

South Africa have made only one change, too, with Cheslin Kolbe fit to return to the wing in place of S’busiso Nkosi. Rassie Erasmus has stuck with his six-two split on the bench, no doubt hoping to overpower England with fresh forwards in the second half.

The challenge for England will be whether they are able to play the more expansive game they have shown in previous matches in the face of the Boks’ physicality and relentless box-kicking. South Africa won their last two finals without scoring a try, and this could be a similar tight, edgy affair.

There’s not long now until we find out if it will be England for a second time or South Africa for a third with their name engraved on the trophy. Here are all the match details you need…

Head-to-Head

Played – 42

England wins – 15

South Africa wins – 25

Draws – 2

Most recent meeting – England 12-11 South Africa, November 2018

South Africa dominated the first half of this match at Twickenham last year, their physicality coming to the fore, but were only 8-6 up at half-time. It then came down to an exchange of penalties in the second half, with Owen Farrell’s 72nd-minute one proving decisive.

It did look like the Springboks would have another chance to regain the lead when Farrell led with the shoulder into a tackle on André Esterhuizen. It was reviewed by referee Angus Gardner but no penalty was awarded.

Related: World Cup final referee Jerome Garces

Did you know?

England’s starting XV has an average age of 27 years and 60 days, making it the youngest team to start a Rugby World Cup final in the professional era.
Ben Youngs and George Ford play together at nine and ten for the 34th time for England. No half-back partnership has played as much for England in the professional era.
Tom Curry and Sam Underhill will be the youngest flankers to ever start together in a Rugby World Cup final, averaging 22 years and 121 days.
Eddie Jones is the first foreign coach to lead any nation to a RWC final.
Siya Kolisi will play in his 50th Test for South Africa